The Joy Of The Mundane RSS

Where all things Mundane on the web come together.

Archive

Apr
20th
Mon
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Throne Under A Bridge

Throne Under A Bridge

Apr
19th
Sun
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Tunnel Face

Tunnel Face

Apr
12th
Sun
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Tunnel Of Light

Tunnel Of Light

Apr
11th
Sat
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Concrete Jungle: Large

Concrete Jungle: Large

Apr
8th
Wed
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Apr
6th
Mon
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Troubled Waters

Troubled Waters

Apr
3rd
Fri
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Insidious Blister: Large

Insidious Blister: Large

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WiiSpray

What is the”WiiSpray“ project?

The foundational basis for the project goes well beyond replacing real graffiti as an art form.  Moreover, WiiSpray
is to be seen as an interface to give graffiti a new virtual level surpassing tactile boundaries of the tangible world.

Within the system, there is a symbiosis of digital and analog as well as overcoming restrictions of distance and time.  An advantage of the system proves to possess a user-friendly design simple enough for children to use.  The virtual canvas allows the user to decide what is saved and what is discarded, all the while keeping the surrounding area clean and free of what otherwise would be a messy form of media.

The actual hardware tool of the artist – the spraying can – remains constant in its shape and
function and is a catalyst for this software supporting innovative computer interaction.  The self-explanatory program requires no previous knowledge or reference of a user’s manual.  This software allows users to make the game all their own, offering a wide
range of colors, interchangable caps, along with the possibility to incorporate the user’s personal photos, graphics, and backgrounds into the setting.

The WiiSpray provides a framework of different possibilities yet without any specifications on how to use it. Every user decides for themselves what his or her creative expressions might be.

WiiSpray is independent of platforms and is based on »Adobe Flash«,
a »WiiiFlash server«, and standard »Wii« technology.

WiiSpray, a technical experiment with a lot of potential for expansion and application.

» Designed for regular use with the Nintendo Wii and for the
three Dimensional interaction concept of Wii Spray.

» A real add-on for the Wii, just plug the Wii Remote in the
Wii Spray Can and start!

» Buttonless design, easy use for left-and-right-handed persons.
Wii Spray uses an input interface similar to the Montana donut system.

» Pressure sensitive valve, up to 128 Values.

» Up to 128 different caps - inexpensive technology (less than 40 cent)
and build to resist!

» Interactive color display with the possibillity to show
the color level in six steps! just in case…

» USB port for charging the battery and load the latest firmware.

» the Wii Spray 2nd  edition controller is able to sense its distance to the wall you are spraying on.

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“Graffiti” to be legalized in Brazil?

Last week a law was passed in Brazil legalizing graffiti. But this doesn’t mean exactly what you may think. In Brazil, “graffiti” (grafite in Portuguese) refers not so much to the entire hip hop tradition of writing, but more specifically to colorful pieces, characters, abstractions, and other painted street art. In everyday speech, it’s often contrasted against pichação, which is Brazil’s home-grown style of tagging, so named because its first practicioners used tar (piche) stolen from construction sites. The semantic distinction echoes a sentiment I often hear here in the US: “I like the artistic stuff, but not, you know, those ugly scribbles.”

This distinction is part of what’s being put into law. What’s interesting about this law is that it appears to recognize the artistic and cultural value of the graffiti itself, not just the monetary value of the property it’s painted on. How will this play out in practice, I wonder?

Meanwhile, elsewhere in Brazil, graffiti is being taught in schools, recognized in an International Biennial, and receiving special protection from the buff. Sounds like a pretty civilized country to me.


Link

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A Few More Thoughts On HDR

After Wednesday’s shots, I was ready to throw the whole process out the damn window.  But I put it out of my mind for a while, let it percolate, and came back with the conclusion that I was doing it wrong.  My shots of the Earth piece & the rail car didn’t look good to me.  Not that they looked bad, but they lacked the punchyness of the bridge shots I’d taken on Tuesday.

I think that’s because HDR is not meant for single-subject photographs like those.  HDR is for senic shots….land, objects, sky all in one shot.  Even though it hasn’t gotten many views on Flickr, I really like this shot of some old farm buildings I got on my way out to Rockford yesterday afternoon.  I did a color version too, but the B&W copy is far superior.

Now that I understand better what sorts of shots will work well with this process, I look forward to more experiments in the future.

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Marching Giants

Marching Giants

Apr
1st
Wed
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HDR Experiments

Since I’ve been having so damn much fun using a photo-stitching program to put together killer panoramic shots, I though it would be interesting to try out another post-production trick, HDR. It’s not a technique I think that I’ll use a lot, but I do like how it can be utilized to make certain scenes really pop in a way that a regular photo might not.

Something I sometimes struggle with in my photos is too much or too little light.  Say I’m under a bridge, where there’s a lot of shadow on the columns and the ground, but the sky is very bright.  My shots usually turn out with the sky all blown to hell with overly bright whiteness, and even with photoshop that’s a tough fix.  But with HDR I’m hoping that shots like that will turn out a lot better.


Here’s the first two shots I put together, using the Dynamic Photo HDR (the trial version, which only leaves a small watermark that is easy to crop out) program.  I got out early this morning to get some more shots that I’ll run through tonight.  I’m interested to see how HDR works on graffiti…I shot an Earth piece with HDR in mind, and will put it up on Flickr next to a “regular” shot of the same piece to see how it looks.  But for now, here’s what I’ve been able to do with HDR.

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